stability

Tune-Up Tuesday Episode 31: T-Spine Rotation End Range Lift-Offs

Today's post is a follow up to last weeks post on T/Spine rotation PAILs/RAILs. You can click here for the link to that exercise.

End Range Lift-Offs (ERLs) are a step up from PAILs and RAILs in the FRC system.  Where PAILs/RAILs works to expand range of motion, ERLs focus on end range control. This helps to teach your nervous system how to use and acquire that mobility for daily use

Questions, comments, concerns?  Let me know.  If you found this helpful, please share!

Move Well, Stay Strong.

Cueing the Arm Bar

Cueing the Arm Bar

In this post, I talk about how to properly cue the arm bar, and some steps you can take to get more out of this exercise.

Touching Your Toes. Are Your Hamstrings Too Tight?

Can't touch your toes? It's probably because you have always had tight muscles, or you have gotten too old.  

When you were a child you were able to touch your toes, squat perfectly and move in all sorts of ways you no longer can.  This is not because you have gotten older that you lost your movement patterns, but rather we get stiff and tight because we sit down and stop moving. For many it can start with school. 

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There are multiple reasons why someone would lose the ability to touch their toes.  The two most common are mobility (the ability to move your joints freely throughout a full ROM) and motor control (timing, stabilization and coordination of movement) issues.  

That being said the ability to touch your toes is usually NOT a hamstring tightness problem.  

Muscles can often have the perception of tightness when poor movement patterns exist, or when there is a lack of stability to an area. In the case of the toe touch, if your body feels unstable while trying to bend forward and touch your toes, it will activate the hamstrings and lumbar extensors to protect and limit the movement.  This is when you "feel" that your hamstrings are tight.  

Touching our toes is an essential movement that we NEED to be able to do if one plans to be active.  Whether it is running, deadlifting, squatting, sports, hiking or anything else in the spectrum of movement.  If you can not touch your toes, dysfunction is present.  

Common Flaws:

1) Decreased active straight leg raise (ASLR):

  • Will prevent you from touching your toes.
  • Impede your ability to hip hinge either bilaterally or unilaterally. 
  • Affect your running stride

2) Decreased ability to posteriorly weight shift.

3) Decreased ability to flex the spine while bending forward. 

The video presents 3 simple ways to improve your toe touch.  If none of them improve it, or worse cause pain take it upon yourself to have it looked at by a trained professional (either a physical therapist or personal trainer).  If they do help, well enjoy touching your toes!  

Leave a comment down below on your experiences being able to, or not able to touch those feet. 

 

 

 

Four Hacks to the Turkish Get Up

The Turkish Get Up (TGU) is a highly technical exercise that requires attention to detail for proper execution.  Last week I wrote about how to properly perform the TGU, you can read that here.  This week I will take this a step further and discuss 4 common technique flaws and how you can fix them. 

 

1) Set Up -

During the set up, we want to have enough space to work with.  I often see people set up with their legs too close together.  This decreases your base of support, making you less stable and increases the difficulty of the first step (see number 2 below). 

2) Leg Kicks Up -

This happens when we do not produce enough tension during the initial step or if you are using too much weight.

3) Misplacing the Moving Leg -

During each stage of the get up, there are optimal places to put your extremities so all your joints are properly aligned.  Often times people put their legs in places that decrease their base of support which makes this exercise harder.

4) Not Hinging From the Hips -

When people are reversing their get up, people often have difficulty with the transition from 1/2 kneeling position to placing the hand on the floor.  People like to bend from their spine and flop to the floor.  You must maintain your core stiffness and push your hips out to the side.  This keeps the spine in a strong position and trains hip mobility in the frontal plane.

Try some of these quick fixes and let me know in the comments section below if they were helpful.   

 

Hinge Your Way Free of Back Pain

What's your plan of attack when your back aches? Painkillers? Stretching? Ice and heat? While these might provide temporary relief, we're missing the bigger picture if we don't address the way we move through our hips.

Often times when your back hurts it is often due to lack of stability and/or mobility at joints.  This makes sense when we review Gray Cook and Mike Boyle's joint-by-joint approach to the body.

When we look at this model we see that the body alternates segments of stability and segments of mobility.  These areas align themselves so that we can stabilize in certain areas in order to move freely in others. An example of this (not on the chart above) is learning proper scapula stability so we can enjoy all the range of motion the shoulder provides.  If the scapulae aren't stable, compensation patterns inhibit optimal movement of the shoulder joint.  

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With repetitive stresses or lack of movement over time, bodily joints have the potential to lose their inherent mobility. Once this happens the body has to compensate for this lack of motion by creating motion at the segment directly above or below.  What this ultimately does is flip-flop the order of mobility and stability.  One of the most common examples I see of this is through the loss of hip mobility.  Most people, especially those who sit at work all day lose the ability to hinge at the hips.  This loss of hip mobility causes either the lumbar spine or the knees to move excessively while moving. Whether bending over, squatting, deadlifting, or picking up your child to name a few examples, the ability for your body to maintain the joint-by-joint approach is imperative in order to prevent muscle tightness, stiffness, weakness and pain.  

Based off this information, one of the first things I assess when having a patient with low back pain is their ability to hinge.  Most often than not, their hip hinge is not up to par... and that's putting it nicely.  Even if you don't have pain, the inability to hinge from the hips will rob you of strength, power, mobility, and overall quality of life.  

Check out the video below to see some hip hinge hacks.  They will make you a better person.  

If these helpful tips helped you out, or if you just plain hated them leave me a comment below and tell me all about it!