Technique

Tune-up Tuesday Episode 36: Fixing the Kettlebell Swing Part 1

The kettlebell swing can be one of the most effective exercises for building lower body power and endurance.  It is also a great tool to help improve metabolic conditioning and weight loss. 

The effectiveness of this exercise is reliant on proper technique.  The importance of a good hinge position and usage of the legs to drive power can help you improve performance while improving lower back dysfunction.

Check out the video below on how to properly perform kettlebell swings.

Stay tuned for next weeks post where I cover drills to help improve common kettlebell swing errors. 

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Move Well, Stay Strong.

Tune-Up Tuesday Episode 29 - Common Ab Rollout Faults

The great thing about the internet is that information gets spread to a large amount of people. When I first started out in the fitness industry, it was not common knowledge that crunches and sit-ups are not the best exercises for your core... or your lower back.  When I would mention this to someone they would stare at me like I was crazy and ask me “What else can you do for the core?"

Today, most people understand that the best core exercises are the ones that challenge the core's position.  Meaning that the core's job it to keep your spine from bending, extending or rotating when external forces are exerted onto the body.

Exercises like planks, side planks, rollouts, body saws, pallof presses, and 1,000 other exercises focus on this. 

The Ab Rollout, in particular, is an advanced core exercise that is often done with poor technique. Many people have a hard time controlling their spines, especially when it comes to limiting extension of the lower back.  This is the number one issue I see with the Ab Rollout.  

Check out the video below to learn proper technique to the rollout and one of my favorite drills to teach you trunk positioning to make your rollouts more effective. 

If you have any question, comments, concerns - let me know. If you found this helpful, please share!

Move Well, Stay Strong.

Tune Up Tuesday Episode 9: The One Arm Row with Dr. Ryan DeBell

Today I attended The Movement Fix seminar with Dr. Ryan DeBell. He offered some valuable insight on breaking down the deadlift, squat and overhead lifts.  If he's in town, I recommend checking him out.

Today, Ryan breaks down the one arm row and explains some common faults and how you can correct them.  

The Technique

  • Set up on the bench with one arm and one leg
  • Turn the leg that is on the floor outward about 20 degrees
  • Extend your upper back and so that you show a "proud chest"
  • Instead of having your shoulder parallel to the floor, slightly rotate your shoulders outward
  • Ensure that at the bottom of the row you get some scapular protraction, and at the top you get full retraction

Common Faults

  • Losing your upper back position
  • Only moving your arm, and not using the shoulder blades to perform the movement
  • Rotating your upper body as you row
  • Having scapula protraction at the top of the row

Questions, Comments or Concerns?  Leave a comment below. 

Move Well, Stay Strong.

About Dr. Ryan DeBell
I’m the creator and guy behind The Movement Fix, making videos, recording podcasts, working with gyms and athletes, and traveling as much as time permits!
I am a chiropractor by profession, although I like to say I’m a guy who went to chiropractic school and my job is to help people however is needed.
I think it’s a basic human right to know how to move your body and be pain free. Humans should fully move every joint every day.
Knowledge on human movement shouldn’t be kept a secret, but should be shared freely to help as many people as possible.
Check him out at http://themovementfix.com/

 

 

 

Cueing the Arm Bar

Cueing the Arm Bar

In this post, I talk about how to properly cue the arm bar, and some steps you can take to get more out of this exercise.

Cranky Elbows During Pull-ups?

Cranky Elbows During Pull-ups?

In this post, I go over the mobility pre-requisites for the pull-up.  By making sure everything moves well, we can help decrease the risk of injury, or help those shoulders and elbows from feeling so beat up.  

Four Hacks to the Turkish Get Up

The Turkish Get Up (TGU) is a highly technical exercise that requires attention to detail for proper execution.  Last week I wrote about how to properly perform the TGU, you can read that here.  This week I will take this a step further and discuss 4 common technique flaws and how you can fix them. 

 

1) Set Up -

During the set up, we want to have enough space to work with.  I often see people set up with their legs too close together.  This decreases your base of support, making you less stable and increases the difficulty of the first step (see number 2 below). 

2) Leg Kicks Up -

This happens when we do not produce enough tension during the initial step or if you are using too much weight.

3) Misplacing the Moving Leg -

During each stage of the get up, there are optimal places to put your extremities so all your joints are properly aligned.  Often times people put their legs in places that decrease their base of support which makes this exercise harder.

4) Not Hinging From the Hips -

When people are reversing their get up, people often have difficulty with the transition from 1/2 kneeling position to placing the hand on the floor.  People like to bend from their spine and flop to the floor.  You must maintain your core stiffness and push your hips out to the side.  This keeps the spine in a strong position and trains hip mobility in the frontal plane.

Try some of these quick fixes and let me know in the comments section below if they were helpful.   

 

Why Squatting Hurts Your Knees

Your form sucks.

You're trying to lift more weight then you can handle.

               You've injured your knee doing something that was not squatting.

You're a combination of the three scenarios above.

It is unfortunate that the same myth continues to slap me in the face on a daily basis. I feel like I'm surrounded by it day in and day out at the clinic, with a potential client and/or a novice trainee under my guidance.  "My knees hurt when I squat".  My teeth cringe and my blood pressure rises every time I hear this said to me.  

If your knees hurt when you squat, it is time we stop blaming the squats for the pain and start looking into why our knees are bothering us.  We have been squatting since we were babies, why is it that all of a sudden squatting is the culprit behind our pain?

If "squats hurt you", here are a couple of things you might want to look into to figure out why you may be having pain.  

  • You lack full ankle dorsiflexion. 
    • That is the ability to point your foot towards your head.  If you lack dorsiflexion, you will have to compensate at other joints to make up the lack or range.  This often comes from the knees, or the low back (and possibly both).  
  • You lack core stability. 
    • Whether the abdominal wall, the lats or the hip musculature is weak, (all of these make up the core) abnormal forces will be transmitted through joints rather then through contracting muscles and tendons.  This will cause excessive shearing at the knees and even the low back, which overtime can cause pain and dysfunction.
  • Transverse/Frontal plane deviations. 
    • As athletes, gym-goers and sedentary individuals, we train and live mostly in the sagittal-plane (think front and back movement like walking).  Squatting is a sagittal-plane movement. Often time when some one squats, we see them sit more towards one leg than the other or rotate their bodies.  This is common especially when someone is trying to lift a weight that is too heavy for them.  This becomes a sure fire way to cause an angry knee or low back.  

Watch the video below to see how I teach the squat and how it may help you squat pain free. 

Leave some feedback in the comments section and let me know if this helps!

Until Next Time.