Mobility Training

Hip 90/90 to Hip 90/90 Transfers

The Kinstretch system utilizes isometrics movements near, and at your end ranges of motion to build a more capable body.  These movement paths help us move from one base position to the next while teaching better control of our bodies.

The hip 90/90 isometric movement path through the bear base position is one of my favorites.  It offers us the opportunity to learn how to disassociate our hips from each other while building mobility of flexion, abduction, internal rotation of one hip while the other does flexion, adduction, and internal rotation.  All very important motions for a healthy hip!

Check the video below for the proper technique on how to do this exercise.

Move Well, Stay Strong.

If you found this post helpful, sign up to my newsletter below!

Tune-Up Tuesday Episode 33: Wrist Pain with Push-Ups

A common question I have been getting lately is, how do I improve my wrist mobility? What do I do if my wrist pinches when I put weight on it?

Well, the answer is fairly simple. First check to make sure you have enough wrist extension mobility.  If not, which is likely, then work on wrist extension mobility so that you aren't forcing your joints in positions you do not have. 

Check the video below on how to do so!

If you have any questions, comments, or concerns let me know!  If you like what you have read, please sign up for my newsletter below. 

Move Well, Stay Strong.

Tune-Up Tuesday Episode 31: T-Spine Rotation End Range Lift-Offs

Today's post is a follow up to last weeks post on T/Spine rotation PAILs/RAILs. You can click here for the link to that exercise.

End Range Lift-Offs (ERLs) are a step up from PAILs and RAILs in the FRC system.  Where PAILs/RAILs works to expand range of motion, ERLs focus on end range control. This helps to teach your nervous system how to use and acquire that mobility for daily use

Questions, comments, concerns?  Let me know.  If you found this helpful, please share!

Move Well, Stay Strong.

Tune-Up Tuesday Episode 30 - T-Spine PAILs/RAILs

PAILs and RAILs are the primary tool in the functional range conditioning system used to expand someone's range of motion.  

PAILs stands for Progressive Angular Isometric Loading, which are isometric muscle contractions for all the tissues on stretch.  RAILs stands for Regressive Angular Isometric Loading and are isometric muscle contractions for the shortened tissues.

In this video I discuss the technique to one of my favorite T-Spine rotation PAILs/RAILs drills. 

Interested in learning more about PAILs/RAILs and how they can help improve the way you move and feel? Click on this link or subscribe below to receive a complimentary Virtual Kinstretch Class through Par Four Performance.

Have questions, comments, or concerns? Let me know.  If you found this helpful, please share.

Move Well, Stay Strong.

Tune Up Tuesday Episode 20: Ankle PAILs and RAILs

A while back I posted a video on how to assess ankle mobility along with a few of my favorite drills to improve it.  You can read that here.

The ankles are often a sneaky joint that, when limited, can cause pain and dysfunction in other areas of the body; specifically the knees, hips and lower back.  

For some reason we tend to forget about this joint, probably because we constantly throw them in sneakers and think of them as appendages that simply get us from point A to point B.

Did you know that the foot itself adapts to the surfaces you stand? Or that it helps bring stability to the ankle so it can do it's job?

Did you know as you squat, run, jump, and move around, lack of ankle mobility can effect knee mechanics and cause compensations you aren't aware about?

The ankle joint is a keystone area of the body that every person should focus on. Here is one of my favorite drills from the Functional Range Conditioning system used to expand your ankle's range of motion. 

Questions, Comments, Concerns?  Leave a comment below!

Move Well, Stay Strong

Tune-Up Tuesday Episode 11 - Move Your Joints Daily, Upper Body CARs Routine

The human body was designed to move, but the human lifestyle is designed around sitting.  

Think about it. In the morning we sit to eat breakfast. Then we sit down as we commute to work. Once you get to work you sit at your desk for most of the day. When heading home, you sit down during your commute. Finally, you finish your day off by sitting down and relaxing after a long, hard day.  

We usually will throw in 1 hour of exercise 3 to 5 days per week, and say that is enough to combat all the repetitive postural demands we put our body through on a daily basis. 

We then question why we have aches and pains, and start blaming our genetics or age for the reason your back is sore when you wake up every morning.

I believe that every day you should be moving your joints through it's entire range of motion. The way I do this is by doing a daily CARs (Controlled Articular Rotations) routine.  

There are a myriad of health benefits for doing so such as;

  • Maintaining joint health and range of motion.
  • Learning increased control of each joint.
  • A self assessment tool to help you understand your bodies ability to move.  

They are also time efficient too.  It takes roughly 8-10 minutes to do a full body CARs routine.

And if that is too much time to set aside everyday for movement, you can break it up into an upper body and lower body routine.  Now you have two 4-5 minute blocks of movement each day, allowing for better time management.  

Use this video (and next weeks video) to start a daily habit of moving each joint in your body.  You will be amazed at how much better your body feels and moves after simply moving your joints everyday.

I challenge you to do a minimum of 30 days straight.  Obviously I urge you to do this forever, but start with 30 days. Take notes of how your body feels over this time - and I bet that you will want to continue the routine once you realize the benefits!

If you want to learn more about CARs or mobility training, find an FRCms near you at www.functionalanatomyseminars.com

Questions, Comments or Concerns?  Drop them in the comments down below.

Move Well, Stay Strong.

Tune-Up Tuesday - Episode 3: Ankle CARs

Today's Tune-Up Tuesday covers ankle CARs.  Controlled Articular Rotations (CARs) and are an integral part of my mobility training, as well as my clients'.  If you want to learn more about CARs you can read my previous blog post about them here

Here is a recap of the importance of CARs:

1. Maintains joint health. 

2. Maintains joint range of motion.

3. A tool to assess your range of motion and overall function of the joint.

Keep the following in mind while performing your ankle CARs:

1. Each circle you draw should be the biggest joint circle you can possibly make WITHOUT compensating. 

2. Move slowly, with control in order to stimulate the receptors within the joint.  This is what allows this exercise to offer the many benefits it does. 

3. Do them daily.  If an apple a day will keep the doctor away, CARs every day will help keep pain away.  

Give these a try, and let me know your feedback in the comment section below.

Move Well, Stay Strong.