Kinstretch

Tune-Up Tuesday Episode 46: Assessing Your CARs Part 2

Last week we discussed the difference between opening and closing angle pain, and what implications they can have on your joint health.  If you haven't checked that post out you can do so here.

Today's lesson is learning what you should be paying attention to during your controlled articular rotations.  Once we determine that our circles are not painful, we can assess what we feel throughout.

We can focus our attention on one of two things as we perform CARs.  The first is how much range of motion do you have, and the second is can you control that range of motion?

NOTE: When performing CARs, the most important thing is the quality of the circle, not the size.  So make sure you are not compensating throughout the motion

1. Range of Motion - As you go through any controlled articular rotation, you want to be aware of how much motion you get in all directions.  How much flexion, extension and rotation can you achieve?

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You also want to compare this side to side.  If you do a CAR on the left shoulder, you want to compare it to the right shoulder.  Often times they may feel different, and can give you information about how to target your mobility training, 

2. How's Your Control?

Here we are looking at the quality of the joint circles.  You are looking for things such as; compensation, cadence, cramping, missing range of motion etc...  

  • Compensation - This is an important one.  The goal of CARs is to work at our end range of motion.  Trying to make the circles bigger through compensation robs you of the benefit of CARs.  If you notice you compensate, on the next circle, build more tension, slow down and if you have to shorten the range.
  • Cadence - If you are going through your joint circles and you start off nice and slow to find that at a certain part of the motion you speed up and rush through the spot, that tells me that you lack control there.  Your goal will be to SLOW DOWN and try and learn how to control that range of motion. 
  • Cramping - Cramping at your end ranges of motion is what we call neurological confusion.  When your body can't control the area, it starts to cramp due to active insufficiency.  The only way to improve this is to keep pushing through it.  Exposure to the range will strengthen the tissue and allow for cramp free movement.  Avoidance of the cramps will not improve your joint health or end range control. 
Yes, this may happen to you!  Fear not, it gets better with practice!!!

Yes, this may happen to you!  Fear not, it gets better with practice!!!

Keep these things in mind when assessing yourself during CARs.  And don't just compare right versus left, but also compare each joint against each other.  The joints that feel the worst and are the hardest to do should be your focus during mobility sessions. 

Did you learn something today?  Do you have questions, comments, or concerns?  Let me know below and sign up for my newsletter.

Tune-Up Tuesday Episode 40: Frog Position PAILs/RAILs

The "Frog" position PAILs/RAILs is a great exercise for improving hip mobility.  It is personally one of my favorites that I give to those with low back pain all the time.  Check out the video for more information. 

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Move Well, Stay Strong. 

Tune-Up Tuesday Episode 32: Shoulder Stability - Swimmer Hovers

When it comes to shoulder health, the ability to control the scapula plays an integral role.  The scapula are the two flat shaped bones that we refer to as our shoulder blades.

The scapula are designed to help keep our arms attached to our body; therefore, learning how to properly control the shoulder blade in various positions can help improve performance and decrease our risk of shoulder and neck pain. 

Here is one of my favorite drills to start improving scapular control and shoulder mobility.

If you have any questions, comments, or concerns - let me know below!  If you found this helpful, please share!!!

Move 

Tune-Up Tuesday Episode 31: T-Spine Rotation End Range Lift-Offs

Today's post is a follow up to last weeks post on T/Spine rotation PAILs/RAILs. You can click here for the link to that exercise.

End Range Lift-Offs (ERLs) are a step up from PAILs and RAILs in the FRC system.  Where PAILs/RAILs works to expand range of motion, ERLs focus on end range control. This helps to teach your nervous system how to use and acquire that mobility for daily use

Questions, comments, concerns?  Let me know.  If you found this helpful, please share!

Move Well, Stay Strong.

Tune-Up Tuesday Episode 30 - T-Spine PAILs/RAILs

PAILs and RAILs are the primary tool in the functional range conditioning system used to expand someone's range of motion.  

PAILs stands for Progressive Angular Isometric Loading, which are isometric muscle contractions for all the tissues on stretch.  RAILs stands for Regressive Angular Isometric Loading and are isometric muscle contractions for the shortened tissues.

In this video I discuss the technique to one of my favorite T-Spine rotation PAILs/RAILs drills. 

Interested in learning more about PAILs/RAILs and how they can help improve the way you move and feel? Click on this link or subscribe below to receive a complimentary Virtual Kinstretch Class through Par Four Performance.

Have questions, comments, or concerns? Let me know.  If you found this helpful, please share.

Move Well, Stay Strong.

Tune Up Tuesday Episode 20: Ankle PAILs and RAILs

A while back I posted a video on how to assess ankle mobility along with a few of my favorite drills to improve it.  You can read that here.

The ankles are often a sneaky joint that, when limited, can cause pain and dysfunction in other areas of the body; specifically the knees, hips and lower back.  

For some reason we tend to forget about this joint, probably because we constantly throw them in sneakers and think of them as appendages that simply get us from point A to point B.

Did you know that the foot itself adapts to the surfaces you stand? Or that it helps bring stability to the ankle so it can do it's job?

Did you know as you squat, run, jump, and move around, lack of ankle mobility can effect knee mechanics and cause compensations you aren't aware about?

The ankle joint is a keystone area of the body that every person should focus on. Here is one of my favorite drills from the Functional Range Conditioning system used to expand your ankle's range of motion. 

Questions, Comments, Concerns?  Leave a comment below!

Move Well, Stay Strong